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$10,000 Reward Offered for Scientific Proof of H1N1 Vaccine Safety and Effectiveness

  • $10,000 reward offered for scientific proof of H1N1 vaccine safety and effectiveness
    By Mike Adams
    Natural News, January 20, 2010
    Straight to the Source

In conjunction with NaturalNews, the non-profit Consumer Wellness Center (www.ConsumerWellness.org) has publicly offered a $10,000 reward for any person, company or institution who can provide trusted, scientific evidence proving that any of the FDA-approved H1N1 vaccines being offered to Americans right now are both safe and effective.

Vaccine promoters keep citing their "science" in claiming that H1N1 vaccines are safe and effective. NaturalNews and the CWC ask one simple question: Where is this science?

The $10,000 reward will be issued to anyone who can produce scientific evidence meeting the following criteria:

• A scientific paper, published in a peer-reviewed medical journal, describing the results of a minimum of two Phase III trials structured as randomized, placebo-controlled scientific clinical trials of an FDA-approved H1N1 vaccine currently in distribution, carried out on a minimum of 1,000 people (for statistical significance) for a duration of at least 90 days. The inclusion criteria for both clinical trials must be properly randomized so that the participants are representative of the entire U.S. population and not merely a desired sub-group selected to skew the research outcome. Inclusion criteria must be provided to NaturalNews for verification.

• At the same time, the vaccine must be scientifically demonstrated to be effective at reducing H1N1 swine flu infections. Scientifically speaking, it must be demonstrated to reduce the death rate from H1N1 infections by a minimum of 50 percent (relative numbers, not absolute, since so few die from H1N1 in the first place). In other words, if 100,000 people get infected with H1N1 and 100 might normally die, the study must show that fewer than 50 vaccinated people die. This would equate to a 50 percent reduction in mortality from swine flu. If the vaccine is less than 50 percent effective, then it doesn't really offer much benefit for such a mild flu with extremely low fatality rates.

• Because vaccine promoters describe the vaccine as "safe enough for children and expectant mothers" and because vaccine promoters insist that there are absolutely no risks of long-term side effects, the study must demonstrate that the vaccine causes no statistically significant increase in side effects of any kind for a minimum of one year following the vaccine injection. You might think this is impossible to produce since the vaccine hasn't even existed for one year and couldn't have possibly been tested to see whether it produces neurological side effects in the one-year timeframe. That is exactly my point.

• Finally, due to widespread corruption and dishonesty in clinical trials that are funded by drug companies, these clinical trials must not be funded in whole or in part with drug company money. Funding for the studies must come from truly independent sources such as a government institution or a university with no financial ties to the vaccine manufacturer.

This is not a satire story or a parody. This $10,000 reward for scientific proof of the H1N1 vaccine safety and effectiveness is being offered in all seriousness. The offer is valid through March 31, 2010.

If proof of the H1N1 vaccine safety and effectiveness is produced in accordance with the reasonable requirements published here, NaturalNews will publish a public apology regarding our condemnation of H1N1 vaccines and issue a $10,000 check to the winner of the reward within five business days. (Per IRS regulations, we may require proper income reporting details from the reward recipient if they reside in the U.S. or are a U.S. citizen).  


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