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EPA to Regulate Rocket Fuel Chemical in Drinking Water for Causing the Same Problems as Fluoride

For related articles and more information, please visit OCA's Perchlorate Information page, Flouride Information, and our Health Resource page .


The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified the need to set a limit on the amount of perchlorate, a toxic chemical found in rocket fuel, that is permissible in water supplies. The agency says perchlorates negatively affects the body's ability to uptake iodine, which in turn alters proper thyroid function and causes disease. Interestingly, this is exactly what toxic fluoride, which is added to most U.S. drinking water supplies, does, yet the EPA has remained silent on this issue.

"There's going to be a lot of scrutiny of the standard because, again, we are looking at but one of several precursors that can affect iodine uptake in the thyroid," explained Lisa Jackson, EPA Administrator, to CNN concerning the agency's new limits. "It's the first time we've ever regulated a chemical not because of what it does directly to you, but because it has an impact on iodine uptake that might affect your child down the road."

In other words, these rocket fuel chemicals are implicated in causing endocrine disruption, and are thus a serious threat to public health. And it is a good thing the EPA is taking notice and trying to do something about the problem. But the fluorosilicic acid, also known as fluoride, added to the majority of the nation's drinking water supplies does the very same thing, except that chemical is deliberately added under the false pretense that doing so protects teeth.

In 2006, the National Research Council (NRC) issued a review of the EPA's "safe water standard" of 4 parts per million (ppm) for fluoride in drinking water. NRC concluded that "several lines of information indicate an effect of fluoride exposure on thyroid function." In fact, fluoride was actually used up until the 1970s as a thyroid-suppressing medication because it is known to offset necessary iodine and instead affix itself within the body (http://www.fluoridealert.org/health...).



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