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Delusional CEO Says Doritos and Pepsi are Not Bad for You

For related articles and more information, please visit OCA's Health Resource page, and our Food Safety page.



PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi said on Fox Business Channel's American Icon program that "Doritos are not bad for you." She added that they are "nothing more than corn mashed up, fried up in oil, and flavored in the most delectable way."

Of course, one bag of Doritos clocks in at 1,350 calories, with 162 grams of carbs. That doesn't sound very healthy.

Take Part reports:

"Nooyi informs the interviewer that everything is okay in moderation. Which is, in moderate doses, true. But it doesn't take a nutritionist to see that Doritos are, indeed, delectably flavored in a way that could cause a body a lot of harm."

Sources: Take Part February 2, 2011

Dr. Mercola's Comments:

If you want to get right to the point, skip ahead in the video above to 13:00. It's at that point when PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi states that Doritos and Pepsi-Cola are not bad for you, but rather are completely fine when consumed in moderation.

Obviously I strongly disagree, as both snack chips like Doritos and soda like Pepsi are on my list of foods you should never consume. Simply no reason that they should ever pass your lips.

Of course, this is not the first time Pepsi's CEO has come up with a statement that boggles the mind. Just last month she also stated that the company wants to "'snackify' beverages and 'drinkify' snacks" as "the next frontier in food and beverage convenience."

Pepsi is clearly going all out to try to change their junk-food image into one that's more wholesome and natural, which is exactly why Nooyi wouldn't let Fox's reporter get away with saying any of their products are bad for your health...but really, let's not mince words.



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