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Study Found Toxin from GM Crops is Showing up in Human Blood

For related articles and more information, please visit OCA's Health Issues page, Organic Transitions page, Millions against Monsanto page, and our Genetic Engineering page.


A new study is causing fresh doubts about the safety of genetically modified crops. The research found Bt toxin, which is present in many GM crops, in human blood.

Bt toxin makes crops toxic to pests, but it has been claimed that the toxin poses no danger to the environment and human health; the argument was that the protein breaks down in the human gut. But the presence of the toxin in human blood shows that this does not happen.

India Today reports:

"Scientists ... have detected the insecticidal protein ...  circulating in the blood of pregnant as well as non-pregnant women. They have also detected the toxin in fetal blood, implying it could pass on to the next generation."

Dr. Mercola's Comments

Cry1Ab, a specific type of Bt toxin from genetically modified (GM) crops, has for the first time been detected in human and fetal blood samples. It appears the toxin is quite prevalent, as upon testing 69 pregnant and non-pregnant women who were eating a typical Canadian diet (which included foods such as GM soy, corn and potatoes), researchers found Bt toxin in:

93 percent of maternal blood samples      80 percent of fetal blood samples      69 percent of non-pregnant women blood samples

Writing in the journal Reproductive Toxicology, the researchers noted:

  "This is the first stufy to reveal the presence of circulating PAGMF [pesticides associated with genetically modified foods] in women with and without pregnancy, paving the way for a new field in reproductive toxicology including nutrition and utero-placental toxicities."

This GM insecticide toxin is already showing up in fetal blood, which means it could have an untold impact on future generations. 


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