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Voluntary Non-GMO Verification Aids Consumer Choice in Boulder County

For related articles and more information, please visit OCA's Genetic Engineering page and our Colorado News page.


Silk Soymilk and some of its other beverages recently completed the verification process of the Non-GMO Project.

Why the careful wording? Given the ubiquity of genetically modified organisms in some U.S. commodity crops -- 93 percent of soybeans grown in the United State are genetically modified according to Craig Shiesley of Silk -- no product is able to call itself completely free of GMOs. However, Silk and some other companies, such as Whole Foods with its 365 products, have sought to do is to get as close as possible, using a certification process from the non-profit Non-GMO Project, which holds products to a standard of 99.1 percent GMO free.

Shiesley, general manager of the Silk business, says the verification process for the company's soymilk, coconut milk and almond milk took 12 to 14 months, a surprise for the company, which had always sourced non-GMO ingredients.

"The reason (the verification process) elevates this to another level if that it goes from verifying the ingredient to verifying the entire process," Shiesley says. "For example, (it verifies) that there's no cross contamination in the dehullers."

GMO in the food supply

Currently labeling for GMOs is not required in the United States, as it is in European Union countries and Japan. The percentage of U.S. processed foods that include at least one genetically engineered food is estimated at about 60 to 70 percent, according to a 2010 fact sheet from Colorado State University. Even foods labeled as natural, a term that has no legal meaning, may contain genetically engineered crops; however, USDA certified organic foods forbid GMOs. 


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