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CSC Announces Boycott Against J&J for Continuing to Needlessly Add Cancer-Causing Chemicals to Baby Shampoos

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A new report put together by the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics (CSC) reveals that, despite numerous petitions from consumers and consumer advocacy groups, Johnson & Johnson (J&J) continues to produce baby shampoos that contain two known cancer-causing chemicals. And perhaps the worst part about the whole thing is that J&J has reformulated these products for some countries, but continues to use the toxic versions in North America.

Entitled Baby's Tub is Still Toxic, the CSC report explains that J&J's Baby Shampoo, Oatmeal Baby Wash, Moisture Care Baby Wash, and Aveeno Baby Soothing Relief Creamy Wash all contain 1,4-dioxane, a petrochemical byproduct of the ethoxylation process that lessens the severity of other chemical ingredients, but can also lead to cancer.

J&J's Baby Shampoo also still contains quaternium-15, a harmful preservative added to products to kill bacteria. In the process, though, it releases formaldehyde, a highly poisonous ingredient also used in rat poison. Formaldehyde can cause permanent lung damage, gastrointestinal corrosion, skin burns, and cancer.

What is particularly disturbing, though, is the fact that J&J does not need to even be using these chemicals in its baby products. It already makes versions of these same products that are free of these chemicals for Denmark, Finland, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, South Africa, Sweden, and the UK. It is only those baby products made for the US, Australia, Canada, China, and Indonesia that still contain them.


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