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Obama Administration Rejects Keystone XL Pipeline

For related articles and more information, please visit OCA's Politics and Democracy page and our Environment and Climate Resource page.
The White House has rejected the proposal for the tar sands carrying Keystone XL pipeline today, news sources are reporting.

The Toronto Star reports:

 U.S. President Barack Obama denied TransCanada Corp.'s application to build the pipeline, citing a "rushed and arbitrary deadline" imposed by Congress to review the project.

 "This announcement is not a judgment on the merits of the pipeline, but the arbitrary nature of a deadline that prevented the State Department from gathering the information necessary to approve the project and protect the American people," Obama said in a statement Wednesday afternoon.

350.org founder and Keystone XL protest leader Bill McKibben reacting to expected news of pipeline rejection stated:

 "Assuming that what we're hearing is true, this isn't just the right call, it's the brave call. The knock on Barack Obama from many quarters has been that he's too conciliatory. But here, in the face of a naked political threat from Big Oil to exact 'huge political consequences,' he's stood up strong. This is a victory for Americans who testified in record numbers, and who demanded that science get the hearing usually reserved for big money.

 We're well aware that the fossil fuel lobby won't give up easily. They have control of Congress. But as the year goes on, we'll try to break some of that hammerlock, both so that environmental review can go forward, and so that we can stop wasting taxpayer money on subsidies and handouts to the industry. The action starts mid-day Tuesday on Capitol Hill, when 500 referees will blow the whistle on Big Oil's attempts to corrupt the Congress."


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