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Organic Consumers Association

Reputations Won and Lost as Food Giants Dance w. Non-Profits

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Peering into the politics of the food industry is like getting a peek behind the curtain where the Wizard of Oz is working the controls. It seems quite obvious that food giants like Kellogg work hard to become reputable and good not by the products they produce, but by the friends they make. You really have to look at the whole picture to see what's going on in the PR arena to understand why, in the end, the consumer gets it in more ways than one. Buying a reputation by supporting a cause

Besides assessing whether huge food processors are good or bad or just doing their job, we should consider the ethics of associations like the American Heart Association, the Dietitian's Association and others who readily take the money of corporate sponsors. Does this prevent them from fully disclosing the truth about the unhealthy ingredients in many processed foods? You be the judge. It's blunt but to the point

This quote from Common Dreams is so succinct that it bears publishing: "The American Heart Association (AHA) has sullied its reputation by getting in bed with whatever corporation comes around with its checkbook open."

Way back in 2004, reporter Robert Weissman wrote, "Subway has given $4 million to the American Heart Association (AHA) since 2002, and will gave an additional $6 million through 2007. That's a total of $10 million. In exchange, Subway gets to put the AHA 'fighting heart disease and stroke' logo on its materials throughout its chain of stores, according to an AHA spokesperson."


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