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Organizations Push for Global Ban on Genetically Modified Trees

For related articles and more information, please visit OCA's Genetic Engineering page and our Environment and Climate Resource Center page.

Five organizations released a letter in early October 2012 to the executive secretary of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity demanding a global ban on genetically modified (GM) trees. World Rainforest Movement, Global Justice Ecology Project, the Campaign to Stop Genetically Engineered Trees, Global Forest Coalition, and Biofuelwatch oppose the potentially damaging impact of GM trees on the environment and Indigenous communities.

"The forestry industry is involved in developing GM trees for use in its industrial plantations, in order to achieve trees that can grow faster, have reduced lignin content for production of paper or agrofuels, are insect or herbicide resistant, or can grow in colder temperatures," stated Isis Alvarez of Global Forest Coalition. "This research is aimed at increasing their own profits while exacerbating the already known and very serious impacts of large scale tree plantations on local communities and biodiversity."

According to a 2012 report by Global Justice Ecology Project, GM trees pose "significant risks" to carbon-absorbing forest ecosystems and the global climate. Trees with less lignin would be more prone to pest attacks and would rot more quickly, altering soil structure and releasing greenhouse gases more quickly. Other dangers range from increased "flammability, to invasiveness, to the potential to contaminate native forests with engineered traits." According to the Sierra Club, "the possibility that the new genes spliced into GE trees will interfere with natural forests isn't a hypothetical risk but a certainty." The substitution of natural forests by GM monocultures for industrial use would also threaten biodiversity, in the same way that oil palm plantations do today. Many of these consequences would impact Indigenous communities, reducing the ecosystem services that they rely on for their livelihoods and survival.


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