Sign the Petition:
Search OCA:
Get Local!

Find Local News, Events & Green Businesses on OCA's State Pages:

OCA News Sections

Organic Consumers Association

Chick-fil-A Has a New Children's Book Loaded with Propaganda to Conceal the Horrors of Corporate Agriculture

For related articles and more information, please visit OCA's Factory Farming & Food Safety page.

As my son enters the so-called Terrible Twos, I've become keenly aware of one thing that makes them so terrible: awareness. After 24 months outside the womb, kids slowly but surely start becoming cognizant of what they have, what they don't have - and what they want. At this point, too, kids begin more fully processing how the world works - or at least what the world is telling them about how the world works.

Advertisers obviously know all of this. They not only know that kids will go full-on terrible in annoying their parents into buying stuff they realize they want, but also that two-year-olds are already starting to develop their own future preferences. Hence, when my son hears the discrete piano tune and Ed Harris' soothing voice on the radio and then cheerily shouts "Home Depot," it is a sign that he is already equating home projects with the local-business-crushing orange Godzilla - just as that Godzilla's marketing team hopes. Same thing for the  Happy Meal, whose child-focused marketing equates junk food with emotive joy and cheap toys - a terrible-yet-irresistible combination for a two-year-old.

From a marketing perspective, the formula is straightforward. Essentially, today's Mad Men take advantage of the awareness that comes with the Terrible Twos by advertising directly to two-year-olds (or at least, as with the Home Depot, by making their jingles mentally "sticky" for both adults and children). That not only exacerbates the Terrible Twos by manufacturing/inflaming product desires, it also - by design - solidifies kids' future consumer assumptions.

This latter objective is arguably the more insidious and dangerous of the pair, as evidenced by my experience with my son's new favorite book - Chick-fil-A's re-release of "The Jolly Barnyard."

How this fast-food branded book got into our house, I have no idea - we are vegetarians and have never set foot in a Chick-fil-A either before or after CEO Dan Cathy's grotesque  comments about equal rights. But somehow - maybe it was a gift? - this book is here, with Cathy's mug smiling at me and my son from the first page on the nights we read it. Which, lately, has been every night.

It's been that way because my son loves the book, and I'm too much of a pushover to say "no." I'm also thankful that he wants to read anything, so I go ahead and read it to him. 



>>> Read the Full Article

For more information on this topic or related issues you can search the thousands of archived articles on the OCA website using keywords: