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Organic Consumers Association

What's Hiding Behind Our Food Labels? Deceit.

For related articles and more information, please visit OCA's CAFO's vs. Free Range page, All About Organics page and our The Myth of Naturals page.

As consumer interest in how our food is produced has increased, so too has the use of subtle imagery of happy livestock grazing in lush pastures on food packaging. They're backed up by claims like "all natural," "cage free" and "organic." Yet in many cases these labels bear no resemblance whatsoever to how the animals are raised. Meaningless claims

While you might think you're buying food that's better for animals, for the environment, and/or for your health, the sad truth is that many of the terms and claims on meat, milk and eggs actually mean very little. They are used to hide the same old intensive farming systems that have been used for decades, a billion-dollar business that does not have animal welfare on its short list of priorities.

The intensive farming industry doesn't want you to know what goes on behind its locked gates, because the chances are if you did, you wouldn't want to touch your food - let alone eat it. If food manufacturers were legally required to use actual images from the farming systems, most standard egg cartons would be adorned with horrific images of row upon row of caged hens, all with their beaks trimmed to prevent them pecking each other. Pork products would  display images of pigs packed indoors in concrete-floored pens, the sows confined in gestation crates. Most of the beef products would have to show the thousands - sometimes tens of thousands - of cattle crammed together on each of the Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) that supply 90% of all U.S. beef, where they have no access to pasture and are fed an unhealthy diet of corn and grain and antibiotic growth promoters.


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