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Pennsylvania Court Deals Blow to Secrecy-Obsessed Fracking Industry: Corporations Not The Same As Persons With Privacy Rights

For related articles and more information, please visit OCA's Politics and Democracy page, Environment and Climate Resource Center page and our Pennsylvania News page.

A Pennsylvania judge in the heart of the Keystone State's fracking belt has issued a forceful and precedent-setting decision holding that there is no corporate right to privacy under that state's constitution, giving citizens and journalists a powerful tool to understand the health and environmental impacts of natural gas drilling in their communities.

"Whether a right of privacy for businesses exists within the prenumbral rights of Pennsylvania's constitution is a matter of first impression," wrote Washington County Court of Common Pleas Judge Debbie O'Dell Seneca late last month. "It does not."

Judge O'Dell Seneca's ruling comes in an ongoing case where several newspapers sued to unseal a confidential settlement where major fracking corporations paid $750,000 to a family that claimed the gas drilling had contaminated their water and harmed their health. The Court ordered that settlement unsealed, enabling the papers, environmentalists and community rights advocates to examine the health issues and causes.

"The ruling represents the first crack in the judicial armor that has been so meticulously welded together by major corporations," said Thomas Linzey, executive director of the Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund, which has helped 150 communities in eight states adopt Community Bill of Rights to limit corporate powers. "It affirms what many communities already know, that change only occurs when people begin to openly question and challenge legal doctrines that have been treated as sacred by most lawyers and judges."

The Court's ruling is significant because the fracking companies have relied on secrecy agreements with landowners to hide the environmental and health impacts of gas drilling. Corporate lawyers even filed briefs in this case claiming that environmental and public health groups such as Earthjustice, Philadelphia Physicians for Social Responsibility and others were barred from submitting 'friend of the court' briefs, which they recanted in a hearing, the ruling noted, "because no such rule of exclusion exists."

But where the ruling is likely to make the biggest waves is in the so-called corporate personhood debate. The Judge spent more than a third of her 32-page decision saying why corporations and business entities were not the same as people under Pennsylvania's constitution, and why, for the purposes of doing business in the state, that federal court rulings that blur the rights of people and businesses do not apply.

"This court ruling is a significant development for the growing movement to restore democracy to the people," said John Bonifaz, the co-founder and executive director of Free Speech For People, a national campaign launched on the day of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Citizens United v. FEC. "The ruling is the newest example of dissent within the judiciary to the fabricated doctrine of corporate constitutional rights. It will be held up for years to come as a powerful defense of the promise of American self-government: of, by, and for the people."


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