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The Shocking Amount of Wealth and Power Held by 0.001% of the World Population

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The level of inequality around the world is truly staggering Many now know the rhetoric of the 1% very well: the imagery of a small elite owning most of the wealth while the 99% take the table scraps.

In 2006, a UN report revealed that the world's richest 1% own 40% of the world's wealth, with those in the financial and internet sectors comprising the "super rich." More than a third of the world's super-rich live in the U.S., with roughly 27% in Japan, 6% in the U.K., and 5% in France. The world's richest 10% accounted for roughly 85% of the planet's total assets, while the bottom half of the population - more than 3 billion people - owned less than 1% of the world's wealth.

Looking specifically at the United States, the top 1% own more than 36% of the national wealth and more than the combined wealth of the bottom 95%. Almost all of the wealth gains over the previous decade went to the top 1%. In the mid-1970s, the top 1% earned 8% of all national income; this number rose to 21% by 2010. At the highest sliver at the top, the 400 wealthiest individuals in America have more wealth than the bottom 150 million.

A 2005 report from Citigroup coined the term "plutonomy" to describe countries "where economic growth is powered by and largely consumed by the wealthy few." The report specifically identified the U.K., Canada, Australia and the United States as four plutonomies. Published three years before the onset of the financial crisis in 2008, the Citigroup report stated: "Asset booms, a rising profit share and favorable treatment by market-friendly governments have allowed the rich to prosper and become a greater share of the economy in the plutonomy countries."     


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