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Boycott Monsanto! Live in the Garden of Eden with Fruits and Vegetables Grown from Organic Heirloom Seeds

For related articles and more information, please visit OCA's Genetic Engineering page, Millions Against Monsanto page and our Organic Transitions page.

 Instead of nurturing humanity through education, healthy eating, natural medicine and planting ancient organic heirloom fruits and vegetables, the Evil Empire of Monsanto and the various committees of the current American administration seem committed to their GMO agenda of taking over the farming and agricultural industries world-wide. Wrecking havoc one plant at a time, it is now known that 90 to 95 percent of the world's heirloom seeds are now extinct; and, what's left are bioengineered plants responsible for promoting deadly diseases; famines due to non-sustainability; altered genetics in plants, animals and humans, and decimated agricultural economies around the globe.

In a devious act of betrayal towards humanity, the Monsanto Protection Act was signed into being, creating a monster intended to destroy heirloom seeds, heritage livestock and to threaten global human survival. GM seeds have had their DNA altered and their resulting vegetables can alter human DNA and RNA.

Fortunately, that's not all that's happening in the plant kingdom

In a movement to prevent the total decimation of ancient grains and heirloom varieties of fruits, vegetables and flowers, seed banks are sprouting around the globe, storing the wealth of thousands of varieties of heirloom seeds still in existence. Strong resistance abounds from home gardeners to large sustainable and environmentally responsible corporations who grow heirloom plants for both consumption and seed saving in an effort to prevent starvation now and for future generations.

Organic heirloom seeds provide diversity in size, color, shape and nutrition. Numerous varieties and strains of plants are specifically responsive to local climate and growing conditions, making them resistant to changes in weather, pests and other environmental conditions; and best of all, heirloom vegetables and fruits support life and just taste better.

The first known seed bank was started in Russia in the early 20th century, and today there are over 1,400 seed banks around the world storing heirloom seeds. In 1975 Diane Ott Whealy was inspired to set up her 890-acre seed bank called Heritage Farm near Decorah, Iowa, where they not only grow and collect heirloom seeds, but house the non-government-owned Seed Savers Exchange. The Exchange publishes a yearly catalog chock-a-clock full of thousands of available heirloom seed varieties.  


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