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Organic Consumers Association

Roundup Toxicity May Impact Male Fertility

For Related Articles and More Information, Please Visit OCA's Genetic Engineering Page and our Millions Against Monsanto Page.

In 2011, Purdue University professor emeritus Don Huber notified US Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, with a letter warning that tests show glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup herbicide, may be contributing to spontaneous abortions and infertility in pigs, cattle, and other livestock.

This wasn't the first time the chemical had been implicated as a threat to fertility, nor was it the last. Steep declines in human male sperm counts have been occurring alongside rises in birth defects of the male reproductive tract, and now new research suggests increasing exposure to glyphosate and Roundup may be at least partially to blame.

There's No Denying Trends in Infertility and Poor Semen Quality

A new report from the Institute of Science in Society (ISIS) has highlighted what appears to be the perfect storm for an "infertility time-bomb," courtesy of Roundup.1 Average sperm counts have dropped by nearly half in the last 50 years, even among men without fertility problems.

Further, ISIS noted, 20 percent of young European men have sperm counts below the World Health Organization (WHO) reference level of 20 m/ml, and 40 percent have levels below 40 m/ml, which is associated with prolonging the time to pregnancy. Meanwhile, rates of conditions that impact semen quality and fertility are also on the rise. ISIS noted the following, in particular:

"Testicular germ cell cancer (TGC), which has been rising in the last five decades. Congenital malformations of the male reproductive tract, including undescended testes and incomplete fusion of the urethral folds that form the penis. Low testosterone."     


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