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'Beyond Organic: Growing for Maximum Nutrition' a Must-Read

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Jana Bogs’ book about her nutritionally enhancing growing system is out at last. The publication of “Beyond Organic: Growing for Maximum Nutrition” is good news for farmers and gardeners anxious to learn ways to grow more nutritious and delicious vegetables and fruit.

The book reminds us why we might want to enhance the nutritional value of our food. Bogs includes statistical information on the decline in nutrition in our soil that directly translates into the crops grown in the depleted soil. The nutritional decline also accompanies a noticeable loss of flavor and a reduction of shelf life. Perhaps, if tomatoes and green beans grown today tasted like those our grandmother grew, folks might prefer them to sweets and fast-food and approach the USDA recommended daily minimum of five servings of fruits or vegetables.

Bogs makes the link between reduced nutrition in our crops and the increase in pest pressure and diseases in plants which transfers to an increasingly diseased human population. She points out that cancer, obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease are all affected by our diet. Improving our diet could reduce the incidence of these diseases.

The growing system Bogs has developed began with her PhD work with apples. For her dissertation research, she compared cultivation systems from the soil, through the fruit, all the way to the effects on human blood when the apples were consumed. Bogs found that apples grown in a biologically enhanced organic system had higher levels of antioxidants and were preferred in taste tests by consumers over conventionally grown apples. Conventionally grown apples are, however, usually dowsed with more than 30 applications of chemicals which could also adversely affect their taste.

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Jana Bogs' book about her nutritionally enhancing growing system is out at last. The publication of "Beyond Organic: Growing for Maximum Nutrition" is good news for farmers and gardeners anxious to learn ways to grow more nutritious and delicious vegetables and fruit.

The book reminds us why we might want to enhance the nutritional value of our food. Bogs includes statistical information on the decline in nutrition in our soil that directly translates into the crops grown in the depleted soil. The nutritional decline also accompanies a noticeable loss of flavor and a reduction of shelf life. Perhaps, if tomatoes and green beans grown today tasted like those our grandmother grew, folks might prefer them to sweets and fast-food and approach the USDA recommended daily minimum of five servings of fruits or vegetables.

Bogs makes the link between reduced nutrition in our crops and the increase in pest pressure and diseases in plants which transfers to an increasingly diseased human population. She points out that cancer, obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease are all affected by our diet. Improving our diet could reduce the incidence of these diseases.

The growing system Bogs has developed began with her PhD work with apples. For her dissertation research, she compared cultivation systems from the soil, through the fruit, all the way to the effects on human blood when the apples were consumed. Bogs found that apples grown in a biologically enhanced organic system had higher levels of antioxidants and were preferred in taste tests by consumers over conventionally grown apples. Conventionally grown apples are, however, usually dowsed with more than 30 applications of chemicals which could also adversely affect their taste.  


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