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Organic Consumers Association

Warning: Half of All Children Will Have Autism by 2025

For related articles and information, please visit OCA's Genetic Engineering page, Millions Against Monsanto page and our Health Issues page.

Dr. Stephanie Seneff, research scientist from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), made a dire prediction earlier this month during an event sponsored by the Groton Wellness organization. She said,

"At today's rate, by 2025, one in two children will be autistic."

Seneff was leading a presentation that showed a strong correlation between the increased use of Roundup starting in the early 1990′s and the rising number of autism diagnoses over the past three decades. In 1975, 1 in 5,000 children were diagnosed with autism. The current rate is 1 in 68, and it shows no sign of slowing down.

Roundup is a weed killer produced by Monsanto that contains glyphosate, a substance that has been shown to cause toxic side effects similar to those found in autism. Monsanto has also been producing genetically modified crops (GMOs) that are designed to withstand the effects of Roundup weed killer. The use of GMOs has come under fire in the United States during recent years.

Dr. Seneff is a veteran researcher who has published several papers on the effects of nutritional deficiencies and environmental toxins. During her presentation, she explained how glyphosate kills beneficial gut bacteria and causes deficiencies in key minerals, including cobalt, iron, and manganese. Studies have shown that children with autism often have biomarkers indicative of excessive glyphosate, including zinc and iron deficiency, low serum sulfate, seizures, and mitochondrial disorder. Similar correlations between autism and glyphosate are also found in deaths caused by senility.    


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