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Organic Bees Are Thriving While Pesticide Intensive Conventional Bee Hive Colonies Are Collapsing

  • "Natural" beehives appear less affected by the strange new plague dubbed colony collapse disorder.
    By Sharon Labchuk
    GNN - Guerrilla News Network, April 24, 2007
    Straight to the Source

Colony Collapse Disorder in domestic honey bees is all the buzz lately, mostly because honey bees pollinate food crops for humans.

However, we would not be so dependent on commercial non-native factory farmed honey bees if we were not killing off native pollinators. Organic agriculture does not use chemicals or crops toxic to bees and, done properly, preserves wildlife habitat in the vicinity, recognizing the intimate relationship between cultivated fields and natural areas.

While no one is certain why honey bee colonies are collapsing, factory farmed honey bees are more susceptible to stress from environmental sources than organic or feral honey bees. Most people think beekeeping is all natural but in commercial operations the bees are treated much like livestock on factory farms.

I'm on an organic beekeeping email list of about 1,000 people, mostly Americans, and no one in the organic beekeeping world, including commercial beekeepers, is reporting colony collapse on this list. The problem with commercial operations is pesticides used in hives to fumigate for varroa mites and antibiotics are fed to the bees to prevent disease. Hives are hauled long distances by truck, often several times during the growing season, to provide pollination services to industrial agriculture crops, which further stresses the colonies and exposes them to agricultural pesticides and GMOs.

Bees have been bred for the past 100 years to be much larger than they would be if left to their own devices. If you find a feral honeybee colony in a tree, for example, the cells bees use for egg-laying will be about 4.9 mm wide. This is the size they want to build ­ the natural size.

The foundation wax that beekeepers buy have cells that are 5.4 mm wide so eggs laid in these cells produce much bigger bees. It's the same factory farm mentality we've used to produce other livestock ­ bigger is better. But the bigger bees do not fare as well as natural-size bees.

Varroa mites, a relatively new problem in North America, will multiply and gradually weaken a colony of large bees so that it dies within a few years. Mites enter a cell containing larvae just before the cell is capped over with wax. While the cell is capped, the bee transforms into an adult and varroa mites breed and multiply while feeding on the larvae.

The larvae of natural bees spend less time in this capped over stage, resulting in a significant decrease in the number of varroa mites produced. In fact, very low levels of mites are tolerated by the bees and do not affect the health of the colony. Natural-size bees, unlike large bees, detect the presence of varroa mites in capped over cells and can be observed chewing off the wax cap and killing the mites. Colonies of natural-size bees are healthier in the absence mites, which are vectors for many diseases.

It's now possible to buy small cell foundation from US suppliers, but most beekeepers in Canada have either never heard of small cell beekeeping, aren't willing to put the effort into changing or are skeptical of the benefits. This alternative is not promoted at all by the Canadian Honey Council, an organization representing the beekeeping industry, which even tells its members on their website that, "The limitations to disease control mean that losses can be high for organic beekeepers." [ref link]

Organic beekeeping, as defined by certification agencies, allows the use of less toxic chemicals. It's more an IPM approach to beekeeping than organic.

Commercial beekeeping today is just another cog in the wheel of industrial agriculture ­ necessary because pesticides and habitat loss are killing native pollinators, and vast tracks of monoculture crops aren't integrated into the natural landscape.

In an organic Canada, native pollinators would flourish and small diversified farms would keep their own natural bees for pollination and local honey sales.

The factory farm aspects of beekeeping, combined with an onslaught of negative environmental factors, puts enough stress on the colonies that they are more susceptible to dying out.

Some small cell beekeeping resources::

Organic Beekeeper list http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/Organicbeekeepers/

Michael Bush's site: http://www.bushfarms.com/bees.htm

BeeSource: http://www.beesource.com/pov/lusby/index.htm

Sharon Labchuk
Earth Action (and organic beekeeper)

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Sharon Labchuk is a longtime environmental activist and part-time organic beekeeper from Prince Edward Island. She has twice run for national Parliament, making a strong showings around 5% for Canada's fledgling Green Party. She is leader of the provincial wing of the party.

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dreamer
post Sep 8 2007, 06:24 AM



Have you researched the liklihood that Monsanto GM corn has a role in CCD? Most non-organic beekeepers now use high-fructose corn syrup to feed their bees, and nearly all the non-organic corn contains Bt genes. This research is documented by Robert Jay Rowen MD in his alternative medical newsletter Second Opinion May 2007.

ladycat
post Oct 28 2007, 01:39 PM


While I agree that CCD is probably related to GMO's, I'd be a little cautious about Dr. Rowen. He's been convicted of tax evasion, and that makes me a little leary of him.


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diana
post Oct 29 2007, 01:18 AM


Farmer friend was reading aloud an article on how bees are kept these days, and so much of the practice seemed terribly artificial. The mention of HFCS being fed to hives seems to be along the same lines. The article cited artificial honeycombs so the bees didn't have to do the work of building, and clipping queen wings, and other things that seemed odd and un-bee-like. She didn't even have the info that the cells for the eggs were made oversized to produce larger bees! --diana

ladycat
post Oct 29 2007, 01:44 AM


QUOTE (diana @ Oct 28 2007, 09:18 PM) *
Farmer friend was reading aloud an article on how bees are kept these days, and so much of the practice seemed terribly artificial. The mention of HFCS being fed to hives seems to be along the same lines. The article cited artificial honeycombs so the bees didn't have to do the work of building, and clipping queen wings, and other things that seemed odd and un-bee-like. She didn't even have the info that the cells for the eggs were made oversized to produce larger bees! --diana

I read somewhere recently that beekeepers who allow bees to make normal size cells don't have the disease and mite problems that beekeepers using the oversized cells have.

Another case of man trying to improve nature and screwing it all up instead.


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El Lechero
post Dec 31 2007, 03:19 AM


Colony collapse is a serious problem, although I don't think it could be attributed to any single cause, but a combination of things. The beekeeper on my dad's organic ranch in the Sandhills was feeding his bees fructose until dad told him to quit and just leave them half of their honey. Dad also wouldn't let him ship the bees to Texas and California like he usually did every winter. Recently the bee man was out to check on the hives and remarked that they were the healthiest, most populated hives he has ever seen--no mites, no lethargy, nothing. So it seems that a holistic approach of total hive health is what might be needed--that and just leaving them the heck alone so they can live like bees instead of exploiting them like migrant workers and stealing their sustenance.