Organic Consumers Association

Campaigning for health, justice, sustainability, peace, and democracy
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Front page


  • October 18, 2016
    Organic Consumers Association
    by Ronnie Cummins

    It was a long road that led to the Monsanto Tribunal and People’s Assembly in The Hague last week (October 14 – 16). So what's next?

    In his recap of this historic international citizens’ initiative, OCA’s Ronnie Cummins reports that a critical mass of us are ready to embark on a “Long March” of resistance, movement-building and regeneration.

    Ronnie writes:

    Given the catastrophic consequences of “business as usual,” and continued domination by the global “1 percent,” we can no longer afford to operate as separate movements—the anti-GMO movement, the organic movement, the Fair Trade movement, the economic justice movement, the climate movement, the forest movement, the ocean movement, and the anti-war movement. Nor can we operate as regional or national movements of farmers, workers, students and consumers. 

    We must connect the dots between interrelated issues and we must work together, from the local to the international level, with fellow leaders of the global grassroots who see the “big picture.” Harnessing the enormous power of the global grassroots, we can build a new diverse Regenerative Movement strong enough and inspirational enough to overturn the dictatorship of Monsanto and the global elite. Coming out of Monsanto Tribunal and People’s Assembly at The Hague there is a new sense of urgency and determination. A critical mass of us are ready to embark on this Long March of resistance, movement-building and regeneration. 

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  • On July 1, 2016, Vermont’s mandatory GMO labeling law took effect. Major brands, in anticipation of the deadline, had already begun printing “produced with genetic engineering” or “contains genetically engineered ingredients” on their labels.
    Food companies were labeling their products nationally, not just in Vermont—until Monsanto’s willing servants in Congress killed GMO labeling by passing the "DARK" (Deny Americans the Right to Know) Act. 
    On July 14, the Senate passed a federal bill, falsely represented as a “federal mandatory GMO labeling law,” that nullified Vermont’s law and robbed consumers of the right to know if their food is genetically engineered.
    On July 31, President Obama signed the DARK Act into law.
    Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) wants to repeal the misleading, confusing and loophole-ridden-DARK Act, which is now being called the “National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard.” 
    TAKE ACTION: Tell your Senators and Congress Members to support Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.)’s efforts to repeal the DARK Act! 

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  • September 27, 2016
    Organic Consumers Association
    by Alexis Baden-Mayer

    On Sunday, September 25, OCA activists joined Greenpeace teams in the U.S. and Mexico to participate in Bimbo’s Global Energy Race. We dressed as bees and crossed the finish lines in Long Beach, Calif., Mexico City and Philadelphia with banners that read: “Bimbo, Cut the Pesticides!”

    If we had been protesting a Monsanto or Bayer event, people immediately would have understood the bee costumes. Most people who have paid attention to the news about disappearing bees know that pesticides manufactured by these agro-chemical companies are contributing to bee deaths.

    But we were targeting Bimbo, the world’s largest baking company. So spectators and fellow runners wondered what was up with the bee outfits. (Our Mexico City team got a lot more than questions. They were tackled to the ground as they crossed the finish line with their banners).

    We explained that, agro-chemical companies like Monsanto & Bayer aren’t going to stop making bee-killing pesticides unless food companies like Bimbo stop driving their use. If a company like Bimbo were to clean up its supply chain and stop using ingredients from crops raised with bee-killing pesticides, it would go a long way to addressing colony collapse disorder (not to mention environmental pollution and human health problems).

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  • September 20, 2016
    Organic Consumers Association
    by Katherine Paul

    It’s been about a week since Monsanto and Bayer confirmed their intention to say “I do”—ample time for media, lawmakers, consumer and farmer advocacy groups, and of course the happy couple themselves, to weigh in on the pros and cons.

    Reactions poured in from all the usual suspects.

    Groups like the Farmers Union, Food & Water Watch, Friends of the Earth and others didn’t mince words when it came to condemning the deal. (Organic Consumers Association tagged it a “Marriage Made in Hell” back in May, pre-announcement, when the two mega-corporations were still doing their mating dance).

    Predictably, the corporate heads of state last week promoted the proposed $66-billion deal as an altruistic plan to improve “the lives of growers and people around the world.” This week, they told Senate Judiciary Committee members that the merger “is needed to meet a rising food demand.”

    Is anyone out there still buying the line that Monsanto and Bayer are in the business of feeding the world? When the evidence says otherwise?

    Even if that claim weren’t ludicrous, who thinks it’s a good idea to entrust the job of “feeding the world” to the likes of Bayer, a company that as part of the I.G. Farben cartel in the 1940s produced the poison gas for the Nazi concentration camps, and more recently sold HIV-infected drugs to parents of haemophiliacs in foreign countries, causing thousands of children to die of AIDS?

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  • You buy organic eggs for any number of reasons, probably related to not wanting to support factory farms that mistreat chickens, pollute the environment and produce eggs that are nutritionally inferior.

    Unfortunately, not all organic eggs are created equal. You may be surprised to learn that most of the retail grocery chain store-brand “organic” eggs actually come from huge factory farm-type operations that routinely violate USDA National Organic Program (NOP) rules.

    How do these companies get away with running fake “organic” egg operations? 

    In theory, USDA standards for organic eggs dictate that hens should have access to the outdoors. But as a 2015 report by the Cornucopia Institute explains, those standards are unclear and thus open to interpretation.

    The only way to make the organic egg industry honest is to get retailers, including the big retail grocery chains like Publix and Giant Eagle and Costco, to stop sourcing their eggs from industrial-scale producers like Cal-Maine Foods, Rose Acre Farms and Herbruck’s. And the only way to do that, is to stop buying the store brands until they switch. 

    TAKE ACTION: Tell These Retailers: Stop Selling 'Organic' Eggs that Actually Come from Factory Farms!

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  • The Millions Against Monsanto Campaign was started by OCA in the mid 1990s to fight back against Monsanto and the other Biotech Bullies responsible for poisoning our food and environment.

  • Industrial agriculture, with its factory farms, GMO monculture crops and toxic chemicals, is one of the leading causes of global warming. You can help cool the planet by choosing organic foods, grown using sustainable, regenerative farming practices.  

  • Protect bees and other pollinators by choosing organic food, grown without toxic insecticides, and by planting bee-friendly gardens.

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