Organic Consumers Association

Campaigning for health, justice, sustainability, peace, and democracy
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Front page


  • November 25, 2015

    Dear Organic Consumer,
    I am writing to you today from the Global Climate Summit in Paris. 
    Before I explain why I’m here, I have two messages for you.
    First, from all of us at OCA, and our sister network in Mexico, Via Organica, thank you for being a part of this growing and increasingly powerful food and farming movement. 
    Second, before you dig into your Thanksgiving dinner, take a minute to thank the soil, Mother Nature and conscious farmers. Without fertile soil, without hard working farmers, there would be no food on our dinner plates.
    That brings me to why an international delegation from the Organic Consumers Association and our new project, Regeneration International, is gathered in Paris. We are here to ask world leaders from the 190 nations attending the United Nations COP21 climate negotiations to hear—and to act—on our message of hope.
    Our message is both simple and urgent. Healthy soils are necessary to feed the world. They are also the planet’s largest carbon sink. If we fix the soils, we can feed the world, and cool the planet.

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  • November 28, 2015

    Thanksgiving arrived a day early for Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) when GMO labeling activists delivered a white-tablecloth, genetically engineered Thanksgiving dinner to the Senator’s office staff on Wednesday (November 25).

    State Director Ben Hill and other staff were surprised, but cordial. They said “no thanks” to the meal, which included apple pie, zucchini, sweet corn, corn bread, papaya and a salmon surprise Jello dish. But they did listen to our concerns.

    The message behind the meal, organized by members of Right to Know Minnesota, Food and Water Watch and Organic Consumers Association, was this: Klobuchar needs to stand up for Minnesotan’s rights to know what’s in their food, and the right of Minnesota and other states to pass laws requiring the labeling of foods that contain genetically engineered (GMO) ingredients—and that means also protecting the GMO labeling laws already passed by Connecticut, Maine and Vermont. 

    The groups also called on Klobuchar to oppose a proposal, reportedly supported by Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.), the ranking member of the Senate Agriculture Committee, to substitute the use of QR codes for wording on packaging.

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  • November 19, 2015
    Organic Consumers Association
    by Katherine Paul

    Last week, while we waited for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to announce whether or not the agency will give Monsanto’s Roundup a free pass by green lighting the use of glyphosate for another 15 years, the EPA’s counterpart in the EU made its own big announcement. 

    Glyphosate is “unlikely to cause cancer” said the authors of the new report by the European Union Food Safety Authority (EFSA).

    That headline, music to Monsanto’s ears, seemed to fly in the face of the findings published earlier this year by the World Health Organization (WHO). After extensive review of the evidence, all 17 of WHO’s leading cancer experts said glyphosate is a “probable human carcinogen.”

    Sustainable Pulse (SP), publisher of global news on GMOs and other food-related issues, quickly reported the glaring omission made by the majority of news sources reporting on EFSA’s findings. 

    According to SP, what EFSA really concluded is this: Glyphosate by itself doesn’t cause cancer (a fact other scientists dispute). But products like Monsanto’s Roundup, which contain glyphosate and other additives and chemicals that are essential to making the herbicide work? That’s another, or in this case, the rest of the story.

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  • You would think that even the smallest bit of evidence suggesting a pesticide causes birth defects, brain damage and mental disorders in children would be enough for our government to ban the use of that toxin on our food.

    And yet, it’s taken nearly a decade—and a court ordered mandate—to get the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to propose banning Dow’s child-poisoning chlorpyrifos from our food system.

    Chlorpyrifos, better known as Dursban and Lorsban, is a neurotoxic organophosphate. According to Beyond Pesticides, studies have documented that exposure to even low levels of organophosphates like chlorpyrifos during pregnancy can impair learning, change brain function, and alter thyroid levels of offspring into adulthood.

    The evidence of the neurotoxic dangers associated with chlorpyrifos’ exposure is extensive and consistent. Yet the EPA currently allows low-level residues of chlorpyrifos on food, in spite of recent studies which suggest that low levels of chlorpyrifos and other endocrine disrupters may actually be more toxic than higher levels.

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  • November 11, 2015
    Organic Consumers Association
    by Melinda Suelflow

    The theme at this year’s National Future Farmers of America (FFA) Convention and EXPO in Louisville, Ky., was #AmplifyFFA. Amidst the sea of flashy corporate displays complete with gimmicks, games and giveaways to attract young FFA students, I had to wonder what message, exactly, is FFA trying to amplify at the National Convention and EXPO?

    At the convention, I spoke briefly with a Bayer CropScience employee, who assured me that I don’t need to worry about the impact of bee-killing neonicotinoid pesticides on our pollinator populations because Bayer has some “really intelligent people working on the problem.”

    A Monsanto employee let me know, in no uncertain terms, that the Biotech Giant’s “America’s Farmers” community outreach programs are building “stronger rural communities."

    But the biggest underlying message at this year’s conference was actually a question. “How will we feed 9 billion people?”

    Bayer, Monsanto, Dupont, Syngenta and Food, Inc. were quick to offer their solution: GMO seeds, crop protection (pesticides), and other technological solutions. Not on their list?  Organic and regenerative farming methods—methods the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development say are the only way to not only feed the world, but also solve the global warming crisis.

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  • Industrial agriculture, with its factory farms, GMO monculture crops and toxic chemicals, is one of the leading causes of global warming. You can help cool the planet by choosing organic foods, grown using sustainable, regenerative farming practices.  

  • Protect bees and other pollinators by choosing organic food, grown without toxic insecticides, and by planting bee-friendly gardens.

  • The Millions Against Monsanto Campaign was started by OCA in the mid 1990s to fight back against Monsanto and the other Biotech Bullies responsible for poisoning our food and environment.

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