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Cook Organic not the Planet Campaign

Climate Crisis Coalition Newsfeed (Sept 8, 2006)

Genetic Engineering for Biofuels .
By Andrew Pollack,
The New York Times,
September 8, 2006.

“Seed and biotech companies see a big opportunity in developing corn and other crops tailored for use in ethanol and other biofuels. That is the new mission of crop scientists. In an era of $3-a-gallon gasoline and growing concern about global warming from fossil fuels, seed and biotechnology companies see a big new opportunity in developing corn and other crops tailored for use in ethanol and other biofuels. Syngenta , for instance, hopes in 2008 to begin selling a genetically engineered corn designed to help convert itself into ethanol… Last week, DuPont and Bunge announced that their existing joint venture to improve soybeans for food would also start designing beans for biodiesel fuel and other industrial uses. And Ceres, a plant genetics company in California, is at work on turning switch grass, a Prairie States native, into an energy crop… Developing energy crops could mean new applications of genetic engineering, which for years has been aimed at making plants resistant to insects and herbicides, but would now include altering their fundamental structure.”

 

EPA Proposes Mandated Increases in Biofuel Production .
Reuters,
September 7, 2006
.
“The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday proposed new clean fuel rules to comply with a 2005 energy law that directs refiners and marketers to increase biofuel production from 4 billion gallons this year to 7.5 billion gallons in 2012.
Specifically, EPA proposes 3.71 percent of all U.S. gasoline sold next year be a ‘renewable fuel.’ Currently the standard is 2.78 percent of all gasoline sales.

 

Hertz Launches 'Collection' of Green Vehicles .
GreenBiz News,
September 7, 2006
.
“Hertz is launching a new collection of fuel-efficient, environmentally friendly cars, that can be reserved by specific make and model, with an EPA highway rating of 28 miles per gallon…
With more than 35,000 cars in the Green Collection, Hertz guarantees availability at 50 major airport locations across the U.S.”

 

U.S. Funds Project to Pump Oil, Fight Global Warming .
By Tom Doggett,
Reuters,
September 7, 2006
. “The US Energy Department said on Wednesday it would spend $3 million to help fund an demonstration project in Alabama that will inject carbon dioxide (CO2) into a mature oil reservoir to push out more crude and also displace greenhouse gases.
The department said once the field is depleted, it could then be used to store carbon dioxide, instead of releasing the gas into the atmosphere and exacerbate global warming.”

 

Court Ruling Blocks Alaska Oil Lease Sale .
By Yereth Rosen,
Reuters,
September 8, 2006
.
“A federal judge issued a preliminary ruling on Thursday that temporarily blocks the U.S. administration's plan to allow oil development in the sensitive wetlands near vast Teshekpuk Lake in Arctic Alaska.
The U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) failed to properly consider the impact of oil development in areas near the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska on the state's North Slope region, U.S. District Court Judge James Singleton said.”

 

China: Fitting Venue for World Water Congress .
By Antoaneta Bezlova,
Inter Press Service,
September 8, 2006
.
When the World Water Congress convenes this weekend in Asia for the first time, the choice of the Chinese capital would be nothing but befitting. The 1.3 billion people of the world's most populous country have at their disposal only a quarter of the water per person that is available on average around the world. But China's water woes go far beyond the scarcity of water resources. Pollution has left nearly half of the water in China's rivers suitable only for agricultural and industrial use, making fresh drinking water a luxury for many of China's 800 million peasants… Water scarcity threatens China's food security as well. A persistent drought this summer has affected the lives of 17 million people in central and south-western China and has caused crops to dry up in the fields.”

 

Use of Carbon Credits Under Kyoto Guidelines Questioned in India .
By Keya Acharya,
Inter Press Service,
September 8, 2006
.
“India is leading developing nations in carbon credits, expecting over 2.27 billion US dollars by selling certified emissions reduction units (CER) from approximately 300 Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects, according to the country's ministry of environment and forests.
But some CDM consultants cite low CER rates, non-enforcement of rich nations' renewable energy investment commitments in poor nations, lack of transparency in the CDM quantification process and several other irregularities in the CDM market. The CDM, one of three mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol, allows Annex I or industrialized nations to buy emissions reduction units, called CERs, from non- Annex developing countries. Annex I rich nations can then count these credits towards their greenhouse gas emissions targets. The principle is to help rich nations reduce the costs of meeting their reduction targets by 2012 whilst mitigating climate change and helping developing nations… As per the CDM rules, the emissions reduction should benefit sustainable development, help alleviate poverty, create clean technology in a carbon-less economy and produce local benefits among others. But not a single one of India's 252 CDM projects, as per the United Nations Environment Programme, deals with reforestation, agriculture or even rural development. The majority of that number are energy-efficiency projects from industries.”

 

Manitoba to Quadruple Its Wind Power .
CBC New (Canada),

September 7, 2006 .
“The Manitoba government plans to build enough wind towers over the next two years to quadruple its wind-generated power, Energy Minister Dave Chomiak announced Thursday. The province, along with Manitoba Hydro, hopes to add 300 megawatts of wind power to the province's energy grid — enough power for 100,000 homes. That could mean up to 160 more windmills, although newer and evolving wind turbine technology could make that number smaller… The strategy is expected to generate $2 billion in investments, $100 million in wind-rights payments to landowners and $150 million in property taxes to local municipalities, according to the province.”