Support the OCA

Organic Consumers Association

Campaigning for health, justice, sustainability, peace, and democracy

Global Scientific Review Reveals Effective Alternatives to Neonicotinoid and Fipronil Insecticides

Use of controversial neonicotinoid insecticides (“neonics”) in agriculture is not as effective as once thought, and can be replaced by advantageous pest-management alternatives, according to a study published today in the Springer journal Environmental Science and Pollution Research.

This latest publication of the Task Force on Systemic Pesticides reviews 200 studies to assess mass use of systemic insecticides in agriculture, focusing on their effects on crop yields and the development of pest resistance to these compounds after two decades. While neonics were first brought into use in 1991, documented resistance to them dates as far back as 1996. The authors identify a diverse range of alternative pest-management strategies available for large-scale crop production, concluding that a new framework is needed for a truly sustainable agricultural model that relies mainly on natural ecosystem services instead of highly toxic chemicals.

“Over-reliance on systemic insecticides for pest control is inflicting serious damage to the environmental services that underpin agricultural productivity,” said Task Force co-chair and scientist at France’s National Scientific Research Centre Jean-Marc Bonmatin. “This new research is exciting because it’s proven the existence and feasibility of a number of alternative, integrated pest management models—which are far better for the environment without increasing costs or risks for farmers.”

Neonicotinoids and the phenylpyrazole fipronil are the world’s most sold systemic insecticides. They are routinely used in agriculture as seed treatments even where there is no relevant pest threat. After two decades of extensive neonics use, studies show these pesticides can have disastrous effects on biodiversity and ecosystems, including harm to pollinators.

“Insecticides are expected to achieve higher yields and net incomes, but this certainly is not always the case,” Bonmatin said. “The overwhelming evidence of negative effects on pollinators and arthropods needs to be weighed against the pest control benefits these systemic insecticides are supposed to produce.”

Get 20% off Mercola products, plus 20% of the sale goes to Organic Consumers Association.

Get Local

Find News and Action for your state:
Regeneration International

Cool the planet.
Feed the world.