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The Latest Tragedy: Sudden Adult Death Syndrome

In recent weeks, media outlets around the world have started highlighting a medical phenomenon called “sudden adult death syndrome,” or SADS, in what appears to be a clear effort to obscure the reality of COVID jab deaths.

SADS is also short for “sudden arrhythmic death syndrome,”1 which was first identified in 1977. Underlying factors for SADS (both the sudden adult death and sudden arrhythmic versions) include undiagnosed myocarditis, inflammatory conditions and other conditions that cause irregularities in the electrical system of the heart, thereby triggering cardiac arrest.2,3,4 While SADS has been known to occur before, what’s new is the prevalence of this previously rare event.

Historical Prevalence of SADS

According to the British Heart Association, there are about 500 cases of SADS in the U.K. each year.5 The British Office for National Statistics, on the other hand, show far fewer cases.6 The ONS lists a total of 128 cases of SADS (all age groups, whether listed as cardiac-related or unknown) in 2016, 77 cases in 2017, 70 in 2018, 107 in 2019 and 139 cases in 2020.

While data on SADS incidence for 2021 and 2022 are hard to come by, incidence has apparently risen sufficiently enough to cause concern in some countries. Before the pandemic, SADS was the acronym for sudden arrhythmia death syndrome, which was rare and with scant research on it except to mention that it accounted for about 30% of unexpected cardiac deaths among young people.7

But today, it’s no longer rare and SADS is virtually on steroids as the numbers of sudden deaths in young adults pile up around the world. The numbers are so concerning that in Australia, for example, the Melbourne Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute is setting up a new SADS registry “to gain more information” about the phenomenon.8,9

According to a spokesperson, there are approximately 750 SADS cases per year in Australia. In the U.S., the average annual death toll from SADS is said to be around 4,000.10

Since the rollout of the COVID jabs, the news has been chockful of reports of young, healthy and often athletic people dying “for no reason” and doctors claim to be “baffled” by it. Doctors and scientists in Australia are even urging everyone under the age of 40 to get their hearts checked, even if they’re healthy and fit.11

Any thinking person, on the other hand, can clearly see the correlation between the shots, which are now well-known for their ability to cause heart inflammation, and the rise in sudden death among young and healthy people.

Hundreds of Athletes Have Collapsed and Died Post-Jab

Among athletes, sudden death incidence has historically ranged between 1 in 40,000 and 1 in 80,000.12 An analysis13 of deaths among competitive athletes between 1980 and 2006 in the U.S. identified a total of 1,866 cases where an athlete either collapsed from cardiac arrest and/or died suddenly. That’s 1,866 cases occurring over a span of 27 years, giving us an annual average of 69 in the U.S.

Data14 compiled by the International Olympic Committee show 1,101 sudden deaths in athletes under age 35 between 1966 and 2004, giving us an average annual rate of 29 sudden deaths, across all sports. Meanwhile, between March 2021 and March 2022 alone — a single year — at least 769 athletes have suffered cardiac arrest, collapse, and/or have died on the field, worldwide.15

Good Sciencing, which is keeping a running total of athletic deaths post-jab puts the current number of cardiac arrests at 1,090 and total deaths at 715.16 Several dozen more are pending confirmation that the athlete had in fact received the shot.

Among EU FIFA (football/soccer ball) athletes, sudden death increased by 420% in 2021.17 Historically, about five soccer players have died while playing the game each year. Between January and mid-November 2021, 21 FIFA players died from sudden death.

Posted with permission from Mercola.com