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Left Behind: Unraptured by the Transgenic Tsunami

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When Stewart Brand spoke at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in mid-January, he broadcast a vision of a Genetically Modified (GM) future toward which he felt we should all be charging with bright-eyed enthusiasm. "Get out there where it's getting weird," he exhorted, "and get weird with it."

As I sat and listened to Brand talk of the future, I was carried in reverie not forward but backward to 1964. That's the year my mom took my brothers and me to the New York City World's Fair where we made a pilgrimage through the most celebrated exhibit of all, Futurama. Sponsored by another GM (General Motors), the exhibit offered a glimpse into what life would be like in the future - as GM engineers wanted to conceive of it. Of course, the future materialized its own way, not in accordance with immaculately engineered visions.

Likewise, Stewart Brand's exhilarating vision of a corporately-owned, genetically-modified World of Tomorrow - a world subsisting on a diet of what he calls 'Green Ag BioTech' - seems to me unlikely and ill advised.

Founder of the famously countercultural Whole Earth Catalog back in 1968, Brand now styles himself as an "ecopragmatist." He said that three global dynamics - climate change, urbanization and biotechnology - are causing people like himself to reverse long-held opinions and to embrace nuclear power and genetically modified food.

Brand is vivid and likeable on the stage, and his talk was expansive and entertaining. Because he is such a prominent convert to biotech, his philosophical reincarnation as an ecopragmatist advocate for nuclear power and GMO food might well have a measure of influence. But not with me.
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