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Saturated Fat Phobia Lacks Scientific Basis

For Related Articles and More Information, Please Visit OCA's Health Issues Page and our Appetite For a Change Page.

Does the thought of a rare-cooked, grass-fed steak, a couple of over-easy eggs cooked in butter, or a tall glass of raw whole milk make your mouth water?

These satisfying foods that have been enjoyed for ages are now taboo, according to US health agencies, because saturated animal fats "cause heart disease" and should be severely restricted in a heart-healthy diet.

As recently as 2010, the current recommendations from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) call for reducing your saturated fat intake to a mere 10 percent of your total calories or less.1 This is astounding, and quite the opposite of what most people require for optimal health!

Fortunately, there are signs that the saturated fat phobia is lifting in the US, and not a moment too soon, as increasing research banishes the myth that saturated fats harm your health.

Evidence Does Not Support Low Consumption of Saturated Fats

A review from Cambridge University, published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, is the latest analysis to confirm the absolute lack of evidence that consuming saturated fat leads to heart disease.2

The meta-analysis of 76 studies found no basis for guidelines that advise increased consumption of polyunsaturated fats to lower your cardiac risk, calling into question all of the standard nutritional guidelines related to heart health. The authors concluded:

"Current evidence does not clearly support cardiovascular guidelines that encourage high consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids and low consumption of total saturated fats."    

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