Organic Consumers Association

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Some Residents Worry about Chloramine's Usage and Safety

For related articles and more information, please visit OCA's Health Issues page and our Food Safety Research Center page.

 More than one in five Americans are drinking tap water that's been treated with a derivative of chlorine known as chloramine. This disinfectant is formed by mixing chlorine with ammonia.

 Chloramine is a less effective disinfectant than chlorine, but it is longer lasting and stays in the water system as it moves through the pipes that transport it to your home (a process that can take three or four days).

 For this reason, chloramine is often used alongside chlorine as a "secondary" disinfectant designed to remain in your water longer - but is it safe?

Chloramines May Raise Your Water's Level of Toxic Unregulated Disinfection Byproducts

 If you receive municipal water that is treated with chlorine or chloramines, toxic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) form when these disinfectants react with natural organic matter like decaying vegetation in the source water.

 DBPs are over 10,000 times more toxic than chlorine, and out of all the other toxins and contaminants present in your water, such as fluoride and miscellaneous pharmaceutical drugs, DBPs are likely the absolute worst of the bunch.

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