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Will COVID Shots Drive Mutated Variants?

Will COVID shots drive the mutation of SARS-CoV-2, creating ever more variants? Or are the mutations primarily occurring in unvaccinated people? In the video report above, The Last American Vagabond host dives into the scientific research to find out.

As noted by The Vagabond, unvaccinated Americans are actually in the majority, still, despite what you're hearing on the news. Those saying "no" to participating in a medical gene modification experiment are not a small fringe group.

We are the majority, at just over half (51%) of the United States population over the age of 18, as of July 12, 2021. (More specifically, 56% have received one dose, and 49% are fully vaccinated, which for Moderna and Pfizer means having received two doses.1)

Based on the scientific evidence, the narrative that unvaccinated people are viral factories for more dangerous variants is simply false. Worse, it's the complete opposite of the truth and hides the fact that mass vaccination may be putting us all in a far direr situation than necessary.

Vaccines Drive Viruses to Mutate

As explained in "Vaccines Are Pushing Pathogens to Evolve," published in Quanta Magazine,2 "Just as antibiotics breed resistance in bacteria, vaccines can incite changes that enable diseases to escape their control."

The article details the history of the anti-Marek's disease vaccine for chickens, first introduced in 1970. Today, we're on the third version of this vaccine, as within a decade, it stops working. The reason? The virus has mutated to evade the vaccine. The virus is also becoming increasingly deadly and more difficult to treat.

A 2015 paper3 in PLOS Biology tested the theory that vaccines are driving the mutation of the herpesvirus causing Marek's disease in chickens. To do that, they vaccinated 100 chickens and kept 100 unvaccinated. All of the birds were then infected with varying strains of the virus. Some strains were more virulent and dangerous than others.

Over the course of the birds' lives, the unvaccinated ones shed more of the least virulent strains into the environment, while the vaccinated ones shed more of the most virulent strains. As noted in the Quanta Magazine article:4

"The findings suggest that the Marek's vaccine encourages more dangerous viruses to proliferate. This increased virulence might then give the viruses the means to overcome birds' vaccine-primed immune responses and sicken vaccinated flocks."

Vaccinated People Can Serve as Breeding Ground for Mutations

As noted by Reilly, before 2021, it was quite clear that vaccines push viruses to mutate into more dangerous strains. The only question was, to what extent? Now all of a sudden, we're to believe conventional science has been wrong all along.

Here's another example: NPR as recently as February 9, 2021, reported that "vaccines can contribute to virus mutations." NPR science correspondent Richard Harris noted:5

"You may have heard that bacteria can develop resistance to antibiotics and, in a worst-case scenario, render the drugs useless. Something similar can also happen with vaccines, though, with less serious consequences.

This worry has arisen mostly in the debate over whether to delay a second vaccine shot so more people can get the first shot quickly. Paul Bieniasz, a Howard Hughes investigator at the Rockefeller University, says that gap would leave people with only partial immunity for longer than necessary."

According to Bieniasz, partially vaccinated individuals "might serve as sort of a breeding ground for the virus to acquire new mutations." This is the exact claim now being attributed to unvaccinated people by those who don't understand natural selection.

It's important to realize that viruses mutate all the time, and if you have a vaccine that doesn't block infection completely, then the virus will mutate to evade the immune response within that person. That is one of the distinct features of the COVID shots — they're not designed to block infection. They allow infection to occur and at best lessen the symptoms of that infection. As noted by Harris:6

"This evolutionary pressure is present for any vaccine that doesn't completely block infection … Many vaccines, apparently, including the COVID vaccines, do not completely prevent a virus from multiplying inside someone even though these vaccines do prevent serious illness."

In short, like bacteria mutate and get stronger to survive the assault of antibacterial agents, viruses can mutate in vaccinated individuals who contract the virus, and in those, it will mutate to evade the immune system. In an unvaccinated person, on the other hand, the virus does not encounter the same evolutionary pressure to mutate into something stronger. So, if SARS-CoV-2 does end up mutating into more lethal strains, then mass vaccination is the most likely driver.