Organic Consumers Association

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New Study Links Autism to High-Fructose Corn Syrup

For related articles and more information, please visit OCA's Appetite For A Change page and our Food Safety Resource Center page.
I know what you're thinking: "Tom, it's been ages since you wrote about high-fructose corn syrup." And you're right! It has. But as I'm feeling petulantly defiant, I think it's time to take another look at America's favorite sweetener. You see, while the HFCS industry still claims there's no difference between how the body handles HFCS and sugar, a new study has come out suggesting just the opposite. And in a very big way.

The blaring headline version of the new study's conclusion would read: "High-Fructose Corn Syrup Causes Autism."

And while that may be a bit of an overstatement, it's not off by much. In a provocative new peer-reviewed study published in Clinical Epigenetics, researchers led by a former FDA toxicologist purport to have found a very real link between HFCS consumption and autism.

The study's argument is complicated but deeply disturbing. It pieces together what's known about the genetic and metabolic factors involved with autism, including the growing evidence of a link between autism and mercury and organophosphate pesticide exposure.

Essentially, HFCS can interfere with the body's uptake of certain dietary minerals - namely zinc. And that, when combined with other mineral deficiencies common among Americans, can cause susceptible individuals to develop autism.

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